Sheffield Theatres - Latest Posts for News http://www.sheffieldtheatres.co.uk/about/news/ All the latest news from Sheffield Theatres including show confirmations, backstage insights, casting updates and information about activities and events at the theatres. en-gb Mon, 16 Feb 2015 10:38:07 +0000 Mon, 16 Feb 2015 10:38:07 +0000 WHATSONSTAGE AWARD SUCCESS FOR SHEFFIELD THEATRES http://www.sheffieldtheatres.co.uk/about/news/news/whatsonstage-award-success-for-sheffield-theatres/ Sheffield Theatres is celebrating today after its production of Lionel Bart’s Oliver! was named Best Regional Production in the prestigious WhatsOnStage awards on Sunday. The success at the award ceremony marks the second time in as many years that the Theatre has won the award for Best Regional Production, following on from the success of My Fair Lady in 2014. The hugely successful production of Oliver!, directed by Daniel Evans, starred Tom Edden as Fagin and 60 local children. It play... Mon, 16 Feb 2015 00:00:00 +0000 http://www.sheffieldtheatres.co.uk/about/news/news/whatsonstage-award-success-for-sheffield-theatres/ Sheffield Theatres is celebrating today after its production of Lionel Bart’s Oliver! was named Best Regional Production in the prestigious WhatsOnStage awards on Sunday.

The success at the award ceremony marks the second time in as many years that the Theatre has won the award for Best Regional Production, following on from the success of My Fair Lady in 2014.

The hugely successful production of Oliver!, directed by Daniel Evans, starred Tom Edden as Fagin and 60 local children. It played at the Crucible Theatre during their Christmas season in 2013.

Artistic Director of Sheffield Theatres, Daniel Evans, said: ‘We are delighted that our production of Oliver! has been voted Best Regional Production in these awards. I’m incredibly proud of the team that created the show. But the award is really dedicated to our 60 hugely talented, young, local actors and their parents and guardians who made Christmas in 2013 a season to remember and cherish.’

The WhatsOnStage Awards are the only major awards where the winners are chosen by a public vote. This year’s ceremony took place on Sunday 15 February at the West End’s Prince of Wales Theatre.

]]>
New shows now on sale! http://www.sheffieldtheatres.co.uk/about/news/news/new-shows-on-sale-saturday-20-september/ Five new shows coming to Sheffield Theatres go on sale at 10.00am on Saturday 7 February. Tickets go on sale for One Man Star Wars, Agatha Christie’s The Mousetrap, The Judy Garland Show, Mr Arthur Sullivan’s Cox & Box and So It Goes this weekend. Already on sale to Sheffield Theatres’ Centre Stage Members, the new shows are additions to the theatres’ spring season. To find out more about the productions click through to the What’s On page here. Fri, 06 Feb 2015 00:00:00 +0000 http://www.sheffieldtheatres.co.uk/about/news/news/new-shows-on-sale-saturday-20-september/ Five new shows coming to Sheffield Theatres go on sale at 10.00am on Saturday 7 February.

Tickets go on sale for One Man Star Wars, Agatha Christie’s The Mousetrap, The Judy Garland Show, Mr Arthur Sullivan’s Cox & Box and So It Goes this weekend.

Already on sale to Sheffield Theatres’ Centre Stage Members, the new shows are additions to the theatres’ spring season.

To find out more about the productions click through to the What’s On page here.

]]>
The Absence of War Rehearsal Diary - Week 3 http://www.sheffieldtheatres.co.uk/about/news/blogs/the-absence-of-war-rehearsal-diary-week-1/ By Hannah Banister, Associate Director This week has flown by. The second week ended with elation and giddiness after we finished a run through of the entire play. Now, everyone has a new focus and they are ready to go back and find more detail. Morale is good and the actors are working without their scripts in hand. I am acting as a second pair of eyes for Jeremy, moving from chair to chair to watch scenes from each side. Most of the actual props are in the main room now and the periphery i... Thu, 29 Jan 2015 00:00:00 +0000 http://www.sheffieldtheatres.co.uk/about/news/blogs/the-absence-of-war-rehearsal-diary-week-1/ By Hannah Banister, Associate Director

This week has flown by. The second week ended with elation and giddiness after we finished a run through of the entire play. Now, everyone has a new focus and they are ready to go back and find more detail. Morale is good and the actors are working without their scripts in hand. I am acting as a second pair of eyes for Jeremy, moving from chair to chair to watch scenes from each side.

Most of the actual props are in the main room now and the periphery is full of furniture, trolleys, tables, four different types of chairs, mobile phones and old computers. To a stranger’s eye it looks like chaos, but there is a strict order to how everything is stored and labelled. The stage managers are in charge of the props and all the chairs are numbered. The manifestos have been printed and detailed so the cover is an accurate copy of the actual 1992 Labour party manifesto, but it has a picture of actor Reece Dinsdale as leader instead of Neil Kinnock inside the cover.

The first day is spent looking at ‘the scenes between the heavyweights’, as Jeremy calls them. The leading roles and key players in the party leadership have big scenes in the second half where unsaid truths are revealed. It is very clear during the second time around that there is no room for sensitivity. They are robust scenes and Jeremy noted that you have to ‘land the punches’ for the full effect. The extra work that the actors do on their roles between rehearsals is vital in order to return to the scene with absolute clarity of thought and intention. We were able to quickly highlight where there was too much stillness or not enough paces and make corrections accordingly.

Tweaks and changes are still constantly being made. The furniture placements are often changed in the scenes at election HQ and in the office. Actor cues and locations are disputed, and we often discuss why certain characters are entering and what they are bringing in with them. Each of the scenes is given an injection of pace and there are a lot of extra comedy details that are discovered. My favourite discovery so far is Andrew’s disdain at Malcolm running away to the Nintendo machine in an amusement arcade.

The creative team is in and out of the rehearsal room this week to see the shape of things and adjust their designs. Tom, the sound designer, was present when we revisited the Cenotaph and helped refine the tone and precision of the Remembrance Sunday scene. There is a tricky emotional balance that we need to find. This scene kicks off the whole play, so we need to introduce the cast and storyline clearly while at the same time honouring the solemnity of the occasion. Tom collaborated with Jeremy and watched the work in the rehearsal room. It made the moments clearer for the actors and helped Jeremy visualise exactly what he wanted. Jeremy would give a note like ‘We need an emotional swell at this point’ and two minutes later Tom would yell from the desk, ‘Jeremy, if you want to go back on that I have your emotional swell’.

We are also exploiting the time with Anna, the movement director, at the beginning of the week and clumping all the big movement-based scenes together. I love iy when the entire company is called and there is a vibrant, bustling energy in the room. We worked the ‘on the stump’ section, which is a montage of George going to meet the public and press film crew, shaking hands with people and answering some brief questions. She had a very simple formula for creating a moving picture with a peel effect. What started as a game of Grandmother’s footsteps became a detailed movement sequence in the play. Our video designer Ian came in to watch and Tom was there putting music underneath. Ian will be filming a realistic film of George meeting the crowds next week so that we have the stage and film versions running simultaneously. The shots will match what is happening on the stage, so it looks like it is being streamed live.

We returned to the lobby of the Houses of Parliament scene, which was a real stick in the mud in week two. We had spent a lot of time adding extra people to the scene, going in and out, to create a busy atmosphere. It became clear that it was too busy and the scene had become a bit buried underneath all the extra people. We made the timing of the people entering much more precise as to not detract from the heart of the scene. It has become cleaner and clearer and the bustling atmosphere of the lobby is still shining through.

We filmed the trailer for the play on Thursday. I went with four of the actors to Headlong HQ where a scene was already dressed for us. The trailer is a George Jones monologue with cuts to members of the Tory government getting ready for work. We spent a good hour getting lots of different versions of the monologue and a variety of shots, wide and close up. We added some extra audio from more contentious parts of the play to run under the credits. It is hard to imagine what the finished product will be like, but the quality of the acting mixed with the film director’s vision was really electric.

The plans for each venue have arrived. We now have a visual reference for how the show will be restaged for each of the houses we will be moving to. We will now have to take note of the upstage and downstage scale measurements and where the entrances are. Jeremy is confident that the direction will be able to adapt simply to fit them all while we are on tour.

Week 2

This week we have been discovering how this play fits in to the Crucible’s unique stage. It is a thrust stage and therefore we are playing to audience on three sides. In our rehearsal room our stage management team have provided a mark-up of the stage, furniture and props. What is great about the design is that we have three moving blinds and an LED screen upstage which give us great flexibility to create the various locations the play requires, quickly and easily. The stage has to become an office, an aircraft hangar, the lobby of the houses of parliament, a flat and a TV studio amongst other locations.

The first two scenes use the whole cast and when staging them we discover the stage’s possibilities and challenges whilst it is densely populated. Movement director, Anna Morrissey works together with Jeremy to build the picture. Scene one is set at the Cenotaph (we use the Centre blind to convey the image) and the cast form lines on all sides for the 2 minutes’ silence. We move quickly from here to the lobby of the Houses of Parliament, with lots of people entering and exiting. It all happens really quickly but with important plot points to land it takes a lot of finessing. We find that fluid movement works really well for this scene. Walking on a curve or using circles is a great way to convey a character’s status and is powerful for pinning someone in centre stage.

The aim this week is to shape each scene physically and tonally. Jeremy’s style is to offer ideas, solutions and provocations to the actors to guide the scenes, and they take up these offers and allow that to inspire the choices they make. By the end of the week we have touched on every single scene, ready to come back and refine as needed in more detail next week. We are working with a physical language that blurs the lines between the company of actors and the characters they are playing. So at the end of a scene it is possible for them to wander up stage and hand props to a stage manager and walk straight back into a scene as a character. This is a useful and exciting construct for an audience because it doesn’t hide anything; it gives them a peak into the backstage world.

We are going to use video projection in the production, which is important. The Labour leader in the play has a tempestuous relationship with the press. As a result, the way the leadership office is run is determined by fear of press backlash. The play is set in 1992, pre-social media, when TV was the most important way to reach vast numbers of people quickly. The stage will be subject to an encroaching number of TV screens as a poetic narrative of its stronghold. More literally, we will also be using video projection to see the play’s incumbent Tory Prime Minister, Charles Kendrick and his wife, outside Downing Street. These visual moments will play on the TV screens while the actor playing him speaks live on stage. We repeat this construct with George Jones meeting supporters whilst campaigning: the stage and TV version happening simultaneously. The Linus Frank show, an important dramatic moment in the play, also needs to happen simultaneously on the monitors and on the stage.

A mid-week production meeting is where the show’s creative and production teams meet to discuss the needs of each department. The big talking point for The Absence of War being the changes needed for the tour. We will be moving from the deep thrust of the Sheffield Crucible to a classic proscenium arch shape stage for most of the tour, and ending up at the Rose Theatre in Kingston whose stage is curved, taking us back to a deeper stage shape again.

Week 1

Week one went by in a blur of excitement; cracking open the process of discovery and discussing the journey of the play. The Absence of War is about the Labour Party’s efforts to win a general election in the 1990’s. Although both the characters and the election campaign described in the play are imaginary, the company wanted to gain a better understanding of what politicians and people in media experience during a real election campaign. To this end we enlisted the help of the playwright, David Hare, and a series of expert speakers.

David was able to provide us with invaluable insight into his inspiration for the play and shared with us some of his original research.The guest speakers were able to further enhance our understanding of the world of party politics and election campaigning.

First, Toby Helm, Political Editor of The Observer newspaper, gave us a fascinating insight into how journalists and politicians interact. In The Absence of War, the fictional leader of the labour party, George Jones, is heavily restricted in what he can and cannot say. Not only can’t he speak freely but he is constantly side-stepping a barrage of daily attacks from a largely right wing media. Meeting Toby gave us a really clear understanding of how that would feel first hand and also let us know how accurately that reflects the daily lives of politicians both then and now.

Next, we had the good fortune to speak to an insider who was a crucial part of Labour’s 1992 Election Campaign. She was able to give us a very personal and fascinating insight into what the campaign was like to be a part of. She was a brilliant presence in the room: smart, funny and unflappable and told us that one of the lines from the play describing the leadership office as a ‘family’ really did ring true.

Dr. Ross McKibbin, an emeritus research fellow at St John’s College, Oxford, had an encyclopedic knowledge of the history of the Labour party and was able to fill in the numerous gaps in ours. He was also able to explain how the party has been modernised and which figures were key in its history. It was fascinating stuff.

Towards the end of the week, the company transferred to Sheffield Crucible, giving the company the chance to experience the theatre space in which the first performances of the tour will take place. We held a second meet and greet so the Headlong team, cast and Sheffield team could all get acquainted. After this we went into the theatre and Jeremy led some exercises to help the actors familiarise themselves with the stage space. In the afternoon, Daniel Evans, Artistic Director of the Crucible, ran a voice session to help the cast understand the best way to project in the space. Finally some publicity photos were taken, before getting on the train back to London. It was a very enjoyable and productive excursion to the North and a great way to end the first week of rehearsals.

The Absence of War opens at the Crucible from Friday 6 February. To book tickets click here.

]]>
Stinging Political Drama The Absence of War Opens Next Month http://www.sheffieldtheatres.co.uk/about/news/press-releases/stinging-political-drama-the-absence-of-war-opens/ With less than 100 days to go until the country votes in the next General Election, David Hare’s stinging political drama The Absence of War, opens on the Crucible stage on Friday 6 February, running until Saturday 21 February. Sheffield-born George Jones, the charismatic leader of the Labour Party is at a crucial point in his career. Desperate to get out of opposition and into Number Ten, he has three weeks to convince the Great British Public that he’s their man. Plagued by a hostile ... Thu, 29 Jan 2015 00:00:00 +0000 http://www.sheffieldtheatres.co.uk/about/news/press-releases/stinging-political-drama-the-absence-of-war-opens/ With less than 100 days to go until the country votes in the next General Election, David Hare’s stinging political drama The Absence of War, opens on the Crucible stage on Friday 6 February, running until Saturday 21 February.

Sheffield-born George Jones, the charismatic leader of the Labour Party is at a crucial point in his career. Desperate to get out of opposition and into Number Ten, he has three weeks to convince the Great British Public that he’s their man. Plagued by a hostile media, beset by divisions in his party and haunted by his own demons, it seems the road to power is a rocky one. How much compromise is he prepared to make? How can he appeal to the man in the street from the House of Commons? And which tie should he wear for Prime Minister’s Questions?

Occupying territory between The West Wing and The Thick of It, this searing election play is a sharp, entertaining and witty study of the epic personal struggle of one man and his party’s campaign to lead the country. Debuted at the National Theatre in 1993, the play was inspired by David Hare’s first hand observations of the 1992 General Elections during which he had behind-the-scenes access.

The cast includes Reece Dinsdale as George Jones, familiar from his stage roles in Untold Stories (West Yorkshire Playhouse), This House and Racing Demon (National Theatre) and his many television appearances including Coronation Street, Silent Witness and Life On Mars, alongside Cyril Nri (currently starring in Russell T Davies’ new Channel 4 series Cucumber) as Oliver Dix and Maggie McCarthy, who performed in the Crucible’s inaugural performance Fanfare, as Gwenda Aaron.

Headlong Artistic Director Jeremy Herrin (The Nether, Wolf Hall/Bring Up The Bodies – Evening Standard Award for Best Director, This House), directs this show which marks the return of playwright Hare’s work to the Crucible following the dedicated writer’s season in 2011 (featuring Racing Demon, Plenty).

In the run up to this year’s General Election, The Absence of War will go on a timely national tour to Norwich, Watford, Bristol, Cheltenham, Liverpool, Glasgow, Oxford, Kingston, Cambridge and Bath Theatre Royal.

Tickets for The Absence of War can be purchased from Sheffield Theatres’ Box Office in-person, by phone on 0114 249 6000, or online here, and are priced from £12.00 – £23.00 (concessions available). A transaction fee of £1.50 (£1.00 online) applies to all bookings made at the Box Office (excluding cash).

]]>
Sheffield's Hills Are Alive With The Sound of Music http://www.sheffieldtheatres.co.uk/about/news/press-releases/sheffields-hills-are-alive-with-the-sound-of-music/ The hills of Sheffield will be alive with The Sound of Music as the Lyceum Theatre welcomes one of the greatest musicals of all time, from Monday 2 – Saturday 14 February. Inspired by the true story of Baroness Maria von Trapp and the Trapp Family Singers, Rodgers and Hammerstein’s The Sound of Music tells the exciting account of the world-famous singing family’s adventures, from their romantic beginnings and search for happiness, to their thrilling escape to freedom as their beloved A... Mon, 26 Jan 2015 00:00:00 +0000 http://www.sheffieldtheatres.co.uk/about/news/press-releases/sheffields-hills-are-alive-with-the-sound-of-music/ The hills of Sheffield will be alive with The Sound of Music as the Lyceum Theatre welcomes one of the greatest musicals of all time, from Monday 2 – Saturday 14 February.

Inspired by the true story of Baroness Maria von Trapp and the Trapp Family Singers, Rodgers and Hammerstein’s The Sound of Music tells the exciting account of the world-famous singing family’s adventures, from their romantic beginnings and search for happiness, to their thrilling escape to freedom as their beloved Austria becomes part of the Third Reich at the start of the Second World War.

Playing the iconic role of Maria von Trapp is Danielle Hope, who captured the hearts of the country when she won BBC TV’s Over The Rainbow and made her professional debut as Dorothy in The Wizard of Oz at the London Palladium. Sheffield-born musical and TV star Steven Houghton (ITV’s London’s Burning, Blood Brothers, Miss Saigon UK Tour) joins her as the commanding Captain von Trapp.

The unforgettable score features some of the most memorable songs ever performed on stage, including My Favourite Things, Do-Re-Mi, Climb Ev’ry Mountain, So Long, Farewell and, of course, The Sound of Music.

This wonderfully lavish new staging of The Sound of Music, produced by Bill Kenwright, directed by Martin Connor, choreographed by Olivier Award-winner Bill Deamer with musical direction by David Steadman, coincides with the 50th anniversary of the film – the most successful movie musical in history.

The Sound of Music is on stage at the Lyceum Theatre from Monday 2 – Saturday 14 February. Tickets can be purchased from Sheffield Theatres’ Box Office in-person, by phone on 0114 249 6000 or online here and are priced from £22.00 – £38.00 (a transaction fee of £1.50 (£1.00 online) applies to all bookings made at the Box Office, excluding cash), and discounts are available.

]]>
Full Casting Announced For Playing For Time http://www.sheffieldtheatres.co.uk/about/news/press-releases/full-casting-announced-for-playing-for-time/ To mark the Centenary of Arthur Miller’s birth and the 70th anniversary of the liberation of Auschwitz, Richard Beecham will direct a revival of Miller’s Playing for Time in the Crucible Theatre. Beecham directs Kate Adams (Helene), Noa Bodner (Esther), Pascale Burgess (Elzvieta), Imogen Daines (Etalina), Emma Darlow (Liesl), Holly De Jong (Schmidt), James Duke (Mengele / Kapo / Cellist / Paul), Amanda Hadingue (Alma Rose), Melanie Heslop (Marianne), Rebecca Jenkins (Varya), Kate Ly... Fri, 23 Jan 2015 00:00:00 +0000 http://www.sheffieldtheatres.co.uk/about/news/press-releases/full-casting-announced-for-playing-for-time/ To mark the Centenary of Arthur Miller’s birth and the 70th anniversary of the liberation of Auschwitz, Richard Beecham will direct a revival of Miller’s Playing for Time in the Crucible Theatre. Beecham directs Kate Adams (Helene), Noa Bodner (Esther), Pascale Burgess (Elzvieta), Imogen Daines (Etalina), Emma Darlow (Liesl), Holly De Jong (Schmidt), James Duke (Mengele / Kapo / Cellist / Paul), Amanda Hadingue (Alma Rose), Melanie Heslop (Marianne), Rebecca Jenkins (Varya), Kate Lynn-Evans (Mandel), Maeve O’Sullivan (Greta / Olga), Siân Phillips (Fania), Danny Scheinmann (Schmuel / Captain Heinz / Second Chess Player / First Trooper), Augustina Seymour (Paulette/ Music Captain), Christopher Staines (Commandant Kramer / 1st Chess Player / SS Guard / Kapo / Pianist) and Alexia Traverse-Healy (Mala / Tchaikowska). Completing the cast are 17 members of Sheffield People’s Theatre – the theatre’s intergenerational acting company from across the region.

Fania Fénelon: Musical maestra. Celebrity singer. Star of the Paris cabaret. Jew.

Arrested by the Nazis and transported east to Auschwitz, Fania’s tragic fate seems sealed. But amidst the horrors of the death camp, there is one small glimmer of hope: an orchestra of women prisoners kept alive to make music for their Nazi captors. Can Fania sing for her survival?

Based upon Fania Fénelon’s autobiographical memoir, Arthur Miller’s masterful stage adaptation is a life-affirming story of the survival of the human spirit in the face of unimaginable horror.

Marking the 70th anniversary of the liberation of Auschwitz and the Centenary of Arthur Miller’s birth, Sheffield Theatres brings this extraordinary story to life on the Crucible stage.

Arthur Miller (1915 – 2005) is one of America’s greatest playwrights. His major works include All My Sons (1947), Death of a Salesman (1949), The Crucible (1953), A View From the Bridge (1955), After the Fall (1964), The Price (1968), The Last Yankee (1991) and Broken Glass (1994).

Amanda Hadingue plays Alma Rose. Her theatre work includes The Gamblers (Dundee Rep/Greyscale), Small Family Business (National Theatre), Rising Damp (No.1 tour), The Master and Margarita (Complicite), Hamlet (Shakespeare’s Globe), Get Santa! (Royal Court), The Seagull, Hamlet (The Factory), The Merchant of Venice, Taming of the Shrew, The Tragedy of Thomas Hobbes (RSC), Office Party (Barbican), The Wonderful World of Dissocia (National Theatre of Scotland/Royal Court), and many productions for IOU Theatre, People Show, and as a core member of Stan’s Cafe. Her television work includes Jonathan Creek and Lead Balloon; and for film Black Pond and The Queen.

Melanie Heslop plays Marianne. She is the founding director of Go People theatre company; productions including Almost, Maine (Park Theatre), and Win,Lose,Draw (Waterloo East ). Her other credits include Bash – The Latterday Plays (Rag Factory) and See What I See (Eyestrings Theatre Company).

Kate Lynn-Evans plays Mandel. Her theatre credits include Helver’s Night (York Theatre), The Handyman Chronicles (Chichester Festival Theatre), Getting On (West Yorkshire Playhouse), Uncle Vanya, The Master Builder, Miss Julie, Richard II (Bristol Old Vic) and The Brave (Bush Theatre). For television, her work includes Silent Witness, Sugar Rush, Messiah, Murphy’s Law, Prime Suspect, Imogen’s Face, Beck, Intensive Care and Campaign; and for film, Aberdeen, Stuart’s First Day, Birthday Girl and Mojo.

Siân Phillips returns to Sheffield Theatres to play Fania. She previously appeared in This is My Family (winning the UK Theatre Award for Best Supporting Performance). Her other recent theatre credits include The Importance Of Being Earnest (Harold Pinter Theatre / UK Tour), People (National Theatre / UK Tour), Cabaret (Savoy Theatre & UK Tour), Little Dogs (Frantic Assembly / National Theatre of Wales), Lovesong (Frantic Assembly, UK Tour & Lyric Hammersmith), Juliet and Her Romeo (Bristol Old Vic), A Little Night Music (Opera Theatre of St Louis), Calendar Girls (UK tour & West End), Les Liaisons Dangereuses, Regrets Only (New York), Rockaby (Dublin/Barbican Centre), Great Expectations (Cheek By Jowl and Royal Shakespeare Company), and The Dark, Maxibules, Eccentricities of a Nightingale, Man and Superman, Night of the Iguana, Vanilla, Thursday’ s Ladies and Hedda Gabler (National Theatre). Her television credits include Lewis, New Tricks, La Femme Nikita, The Murder Room, Aristocrats, Crime & Punishment, The Oresteia, Tinker, Tailor, Soldier, Spy, Smiley’ s People, How Green Was My Valley, I, Claudius, The Magician’s House, Ballykissangel, Summer Silence and Snow Spider; and for film, Gigolos, Goodbye Mr Chips, Coming and Going, Dune, Murphy’s War, Valmont, The Age of Innocence, House of America, Alice Through the Looking Glass, Under Milk Wood.

Christopher Staines plays Commandant Kramer. For theatre his credits include Our Town (Almeida Theatre), Doctor Faustus (Rise Bankside), Duck, Death and the Tulip (Orange Tree Theatre), for the National Theatre – She Stoops to Conquer, A Laughing Matter (also Out of Joint), Hamlet (US tour), Amy’s View (also Wyndham’s Theatre), and King Lear/A Midsummer Night’s Dream (Tobacco Factory). His television work includes Wolf Hall, Handel’s Messiah at the Foundling Hospital, Garrow’s Law, On Expenses, Survivors, Judge John Deed, Foyle’s War, The Student Prince, Highlander, This Life, The Queen’s Nose, The Ruby Ring, Good Friday 1663 and Pride and Prejudice; and for film, Mrs Dalloway.

Richard Beecham directs. His theatre credits include Dancing at Lughnasa, In Praise of Love, Humble Boy (Royal & Derngate, Northampton), Rutherford & Son (Northern Stage), Red Light Winter, In A Garden, Henry IV Part 1 (Theatre Royal Bath), The Invention of Love, The School for Scandal, The Miser, Side by Side by Sondheim (Salisbury Playhouse), A Taste of Honey, Neville’s Island, How The Other Half Loves (Watford Palace Theatre), The Two Gentlemen of Verona, Private Lives, Charley’s Aunt, Black Comedy/Real Inspector Hound (Northcott Theatre Exeter) and Entertaining Mr Sloane, Early One Morning (Octagon Theatre Bolton). Beecham also curates large cultural events including the National Commemorative Event for Holocaust Memorial Day (Newcastle Theatre Royal), and The Human Cost (Young Vic London). He is an Associate Artist of HighTide Festival Theatre.

Tickets for Playing For Time are on sale now from Sheffield Theatres’ Box Office, from £12.00 – £23.00 (concessions available). To book, or for more information, call 0114 249 6000 or click here. A transaction fee of £1.50 (£1.00 online) applies to all bookings made at the Box Office (excl. cash).

]]>